Robert F. Higgins

Senior Lecturer of Business Administration

Unit: Entrepreneurial Management

Contact:

(617) 384-7241

Send Email

Bob Higgins is a Senior Lecturer at Harvard Business School and a Founder and General Partner at Causeway Media Partners. Causeway is focused on backing young growth companies in sports media. Bob is also Founding Partner at Highland Capital Partners.  He created and currently teaches a course in the EC called Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT and Services (EHITS).  For several years, Bob taught the first year course, The Entrepreneurial Manager.  He is a member of the Health Care Initiative, the Social Enterprise Initiative, and the Harvard Faculty Committee for the MD/MBA program. In addition, he has served as a director of the National Venture Capital Association and as President of the New England Venture Capital Association.

Earlier, he was the Executive Director of the John A. Hartford Foundation in New York, a private foundation that supports programs in medical research and health care management.  He managed two other New York foundations prior to the Hartford Foundation: the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation and the Florence Vanderbilt Burden Foundation.

From 1971 to 1973,  Bob served in Washington as the Assistant to the head of the International Division of the Treasury and as Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce.  Prior to going to Washington, he was on active duty in the Army as an officer at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Bob is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He was graduated from the Harvard Business School and Harvard College.

 

Publications

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Claritas Genomics

    Dr. Patrice Milos is the first CEO of Claritas Genomics (Claritas) and she faces a number of challenges in scaling the young company. Claritas was formed around a lab spun out from Boston Children's Hospital (BCH) which had performed genomic tests for the hospital. Now Milos has to generate new business for Claritas from pediatric hospitals around the country and provide a high level of timely service to its clients. The company also has a research mission to build a database of genomic information to improve the scientific understanding of various diseases.

    Milos needs to find customers and strategic partners to reach the company's goals, but with whom should Claritas partner? A healthcare IT or software company? Healthcare technology and instruments companies? Other hospitals? What does the company need from its partners in order to reach scale? Was this the right time to bring in pure financial investors such as venture capital or private equity companies?

    Keywords: healthcare; healthcare startups; entrepreneurship; genetic testing; genetics diagnostics; spinning out hospital services; spin-out; Health Care and Treatment; Genetics; Entrepreneurship; Biotechnology Industry; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Matthew G. Preble. "Claritas Genomics." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 815-032, November 2014. View Details
  2. Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT Services (EHITS) Fall Term 2014: Course Outline and Syllabus

    This is the syllabus and course outline for "Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT and Services (EHITS)" taught by Prof. Bob Higgins in the fall of 2014. Contains the course overview, objectives, goals and themes.

    Keywords: Healthcare Technology; health services; healthcare ventures; Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Information Technology; Health Industry; Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F. "Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT Services (EHITS) Fall Term 2014: Course Outline and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 815-005, July 2014. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  3. Claritas Genomics

    Claritas Genomics was formed in January 2013 when BCH spun out its Genetics Diagnostic Lab into a fully commercial entity. Claritas offered over 100 genomic tests to detect a range of conditions, including autism and intellectual disabilities, and was developing new tests that provided clearer and more relevant information for physicians to use in treating patients. Claritas wanted to increase the speed at which genomic research discoveries occurred and translate this research into better diagnostic tests. To achieve this, it planned to collaborate with other children's hospitals through a research network it was developing. BCH was the company's majority owner, and Life Technologies (Life), a major manufacturer of sequencing equipment and services, was a minority owner. By the end of the year the CEO of Claritas Genomics, Dr. Patrice Milos, had to put Claritas in a position to grow and needed to have in place the software and IT platforms—the databases, search tools, and other programs—that would help the company reach scale.

    Keywords: Boston Children's Hospital; genetic engineering; genetics; genetically modified; genetics diagnostics; information technology; Information Management; health care industry; healthcare IT; Healthcare Technology; healthcare ventures; Biotechnology Industry; Biomedical Research; Patrice Milos; genomics; genomic testing; Life Technologies; Health Care and Treatment; Information Technology; Information Management; Genetics; Biotechnology Industry; Information Technology Industry; Health Industry; Boston; Massachusetts; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Matthew Preble. "Claritas Genomics." Harvard Business School Case 814-032, September 2013. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  4. Steward Health Care System

    Steward Health has raised private equity and has converted from not-for-profit to for-profit. The case describes its Accountable Care Organization (ACO) and asks whether it should continue this experiment.

    Keywords: accountable care organization; ACO; Medicare; Medicaid; medical services; Cerberus; Caritas; health care policy; health care industry; provider organizations; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Noah Fisher. "Steward Health Care System." Harvard Business School Case 814-029, October 2013. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  5. Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT Services (EHITS) Fall Term 2013: Course Outline and Syllabus

    This is the syllabus and course outline for "Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT and Services (EHITS)" taught by Prof. Bob Higgins in the fall of 2013. Contains the course overview, objectives, goals and themes.

    Keywords: Healthcare Technology; health services; healthcare ventures; Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Information Technology; Health Industry; Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F. "Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT Services (EHITS) Fall Term 2013: Course Outline and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 814-022, August 2013. (Revised September 2013.) View Details
  6. A Note on Healthcare IT and Applications to the Healthcare Industry

    This note provides an overview of three key healthcare IT areas: electronic medical records and electronic health records, revenue cycle management, and telemedicine. This note also contains a glossary of key terms and acronyms in this space as well as exhibits detailing unit economics, market dynamics, and key players.

    Keywords: health care; health care industry; healthcare IT; healthcare; Healthcare Technology; healthcare ventures; electronic medical records; electronic health records; revenue cycle management; telemedicine; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Information Technology; Information Management; Information Technology Industry; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Diana Maichin. "A Note on Healthcare IT and Applications to the Healthcare Industry." Harvard Business School Background Note 814-033, September 2013. View Details
  7. Sample6: Innovating to Make Food Safer

    Tim Curran, CEO of Sample6, a start-up biotechnology company developing a novel food safety diagnostics platform, must decide how to partner with food industry players. How can he best convince leaders in this mature industry to adopt a new technology and improve food safety? Additionally, he faces a number of questions related to product development, marketing, regulatory compliance, and dynamic industry trends. This case provides an overview of food safety in the United States, and focuses on the strategic goal of transforming food safety from a "necessary evil" to a brand-enhancing differentiator.

    Keywords: Data Analytics; Food Safety; Biotechnology Industry; biotechnology; nutrition; Entrepreneurship; Product; Partners and Partnerships; Food; Technological Innovation; Business Startups; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Product Development; Agribusiness; Information Technology; Globalization; Performance Improvement; Safety; Technology Adoption; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Biotechnology Industry; Information Industry; United States; Boston; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Kirsten Kester. "Sample6: Innovating to Make Food Safer." Harvard Business School Case 814-014, July 2013. View Details
  8. Rock Health

    This is the teaching note associated with HBS Case #813035. The case should enable students to identify emerging challenges, evaluate Rock Health's funding model, debate the effectiveness of its incubation service and assess its long-term viability.

    Keywords: innovation; Incubation; Healthcare Technology; entrepreneurship; Startups; Entrepreneurship; Innovation and Management; Health Care and Treatment; Business Startups; Health Industry; San Francisco; California; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert, and Ian McKown Cornell. "Rock Health." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 813-136, June 2013. View Details
  9. Rock Health

    Rock Health was a San Francisco–based nonprofit organization offering accelerator services to spur innovation at the intersection of healthcare and technology. The company was the creation of Halle Tecco (HBS '11) and her HBS classmate Nate Gross (HBS '11), who met early in their first year at the HBS Healthcare Club meeting and decided to undertake a year-long field study that married their shared interests in healthcare, technology, and entrepreneurship. Rock Health supported health-tech entrepreneurs with a startup grant of $20,000, office space, and a wide variety of professional support services. Entrepreneurial teams that participated in Rock Health's programs promoted services ranging from data-driven technologies that helped manage stress to mobile tools that attempted to diagnosis medical conditions as diverse as Alzheimer's disease and foot ulcers. The case is set in August 2011 as Rock Health is wrapping up its third group of entrepreneurs in a Boston program and planning for its fourth class at the home office. The case should enable students to identify emerging challenges, evaluate Rock Health's funding model, debate the effectiveness of its incubation service, and assess its long-term viability.

    Keywords: innovation; Incubation; Healthcare Technology; entrepreneurship; Startups; Entrepreneurship; Innovation and Management; Health Care and Treatment; Business Startups; Health Industry; San Francisco; California; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Ian McKown Cornell. "Rock Health." Harvard Business School Case 813-035, October 2012. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  10. Predilytics

    The management team at Predilytics, a healthcare analytics firm, must decide whether to accept a Series A venture capital financing deal. The company provided analytic services to healthcare plans, typically Medicare Advantage plans, in efforts to draw conclusions from massive amounts of patient data. The company still had enough funding from a seed round to operate on a low-key basis for a few more months, but the team hoped to move forward aggressively and scale its business. They also needed to make business choices about next steps.

    Keywords: analytics; healthcare; Medicare; Health Care and Treatment; Mathematical Methods; Health Industry; New England; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Annelena Lobb. "Predilytics." Harvard Business School Case 813-023, October 2012. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  11. Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: Venture Philanthropy Funding for Biotech

    In 2001, Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated acquired the San Diego-based biotech company, Aurora Biosciences. The combination of Vertex's and Aurora's technologies would improve the flow of novel drug candidates into development. However, several questions related to the integration of Aurora into Vertex were still unresolved, the most pressing being Aurora's major collaboration with the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF). Were venture philanthropy and foundation deals an appropriate funding mechanism for a public company like Vertex? How could the board of Vertex and the CFF fundamentally align the objectives of a for-profit company with those of a non-profit institution? Those were the questions faced by the Vertex executives.

    Keywords: philanthropy; philanthropy funding; innovation; funding model; Venture Capital; Partners and Partnerships; Financing and Loans; Investment Funds; Acquisition; Giving and Philanthropy; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; San Diego;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Sophie LaMontagne, and Brent Kazan. "Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: Venture Philanthropy Funding for Biotech." Harvard Business School Case 808-005, October 2007. (Revised July 2013.) View Details
  12. Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: Venture Philanthropy Funding for Biotech (TP)

    This is the teaching note related to HBS case 808005. In 2001, Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated acquired the San Diego-based biotech company, Aurora Biosciences. The combination of Vertex's and Aurora's technologies would improve the flow of novel drug candidates into development. However, several questions related to the integration of Aurora into Vertex were still unresolved, the most pressing being Aurora's major collaboration with the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF). Were venture philanthropy and foundation deals an appropriate funding mechanism for a public company like Vertex?

    Keywords: venture philanthropy; biotechnology; funding philanthropy venture; venture capital; cystic fibrosis; foundations; Pharmaceuticals; Mergers and Acquisitions; For-Profit Firms; Venture Capital; Giving and Philanthropy; Science-Based Business; Nonprofit Organizations; Pharmaceutical Industry; Biotechnology Industry; United States; San Diego;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F. "Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: Venture Philanthropy Funding for Biotech (TP)." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 813-021, October 2012. View Details
  13. Odyssey Healthcare

    In January 2001, Dick Burnham, CEO of Odyssey Healthcare, and Odyssey's Board of Directors were considering selling the hospice care company to a larger provider or making an initial public offering (IPO). With 38 hospice locations in 21 states, Odyssey had been providing care to the terminally ill since its first location opened in 1996. Since then, the company had grown rapidly through a series of acquisitions, development of new hospice locations, and organic growth. Odyssey had just realized its first profitable year in 2000—recording a net income of $3.1 million—and was still a relatively young company. In addition, the hospice industry was subject to extensive federal, state, and local regulations relating to payment for hospice services and conduct of operations. Burnham was unsure how the market would react to a company with such government-dependent revenue streams. Additionally, the recent collapse of the "dot-com" boom in 2000 might make it impossible to float an IPO at all given the prevailing market conditions. On a positive note, however, healthcare companies were commonly thought to be recession proof and thus might be a sound investment in the event of a down-turning economy. Burnham had to decide if this was the right time for an exit, and if so, what the best exit would be.

    Keywords: liquidity; venture creation/development; venture capital; hospice; Venture Capital; Financial Liquidity; Business Exit or Shutdown; Business Growth and Maturation; Business Plan; Entrepreneurship; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Virginia Fuller, and Umer Raffat. "Odyssey Healthcare." Harvard Business School Case 809-052, September 2008. (Revised June 2013.) View Details
  14. Odyssey Healthcare (TN)

    Teaching Note for [809052].

    Keywords: Governing and Advisory Boards; Initial Public Offering; Mergers and Acquisitions; Growth and Development; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Service Operations; Revenue; Business Exit or Shutdown; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F. "Odyssey Healthcare (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 810-025, September 2009. View Details
  15. D2Hawkeye: Growing the Medical IT Enterprise

    In mid-March 2007, Chris Kryder sat in his office and thought about how to best finance his company's growth. Over the previous five years as founder and CEO of D2Hawkeye, a Waltham, Massachusetts-based healthcare analytics company, Kryder had grown the firm from a six-person start-up into a leading developer and provider of medical analytics in the U.S. He had three term sheets in hand—two from strategic investors and one from a venture capital firm. Each offer had its advantages and disadvantages and Kryder needed to decide which offer to accept.

    Keywords: strategy development; strategic positioning; strategic vision; Venture Capital; Small Business; Investment; Growth Management; Expansion; Business Growth and Maturation; Decision Choices and Conditions; Financing and Loans; Business Startups; Financial Strategy; Business Strategy; Service Industry; Health Industry; Waltham;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Rosie O'Donnell, Sophie LaMontagne, and Brent Kazan. "D2Hawkeye: Growing the Medical IT Enterprise." Harvard Business School Case 808-006, November 2007. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  16. eClinicalWorks: The Paths to Growth

    In January 2006, eClinicalWorks (eCW) had an acquisition opportunity that could fundamentally change the way they had done business since the inception of the company in 1999. eClinicalWorks was a privately run business in the healthcare information technology field that took in $25 million in revenue in 2005. Revenues for 2006 were projected to reach $40 million. This successful electronic medical record (EMR) company had grown thanks to their reliable software and responsive customer service. The company had achieved this growth without the help of any outside financing. The five co-founders of eCW, who treated each other like an extended family, invested years of sweat equity and hard work to shape eCW as they wanted. They were also proud of their company culture, which de-emphasized traditional company hierarchies and encouraged independent thinking and cooperative working arrangements across departments. Keeping the company private, in their view, had helped them to maintain this culture. The opportunity to acquire another EMR company offered eCW the chance to grow quickly in an industry that is estimated to take in more than $40 billion in overall revenues in 2007. But this acquisition would require outside financing of some sort. Was this the moment to accelerate the rate of growth to which eCW had become accustomed—catching up with, rather than anticipating, how their customer base would expand? Or should they maintain the same approach that had worked so well since 1999?

    Keywords: young companies; strategic revelation; strategy and execution; strategy development; strategy and leadership; financing strategy; Financing Risk; financing; Expansion; Business Growth and Maturation; Organizational Culture; Financing and Loans; Customer Focus and Relationships; Acquisition; Growth and Development Strategy; Information Technology Industry; Health Industry; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Mark Rennella. "eClinicalWorks: The Paths to Growth." Harvard Business School Case 807-025, December 2006. (Revised September 2014.) View Details
  17. Kyruus: Big Data's Search for the Killer App

    Kyruus is used in a course at HBS on Entrepreneurship in Healthcare IT and Services (EHITS). It describes a young company that has built a very large database on physicians. The company has had some early successful pilots with prominent customers, but it is now faced with choices on which markets to pursue. These markets each offer opportunity, but the company must make some decisions. As is often the case in early stage companies, these choices will affect a number of things, including organizational needs and capital requirements.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Information Technology; Business Startups; Boston;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Penrose O'Donnell, and Mehul Bhatt. "Kyruus: Big Data's Search for the Killer App." Harvard Business School Case 813-060, September 2012. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  18. Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital in Healthcare Fall Term 2011: Course Outline and Syllabus

    Provides an overview of the second-year MBA elective course Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital in Healthcare.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Health Care and Treatment;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Robert F. Higgins. "Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital in Healthcare Fall Term 2011: Course Outline and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Background Note 806-048, November 2005. (Revised November 2011.) View Details
  19. Generation Health: A Pioneer in Genetics Benefit Management (A)

    Generation Health, a pioneer in the new field of genetics benefit management and a newly formed company, faces many strategic issues. CEO Per Lofberg is in the midst of negotiating a partnership with a major pharmacy benefit management company. As part of these negotiations, Lofberg must decide whether the time is right for such a strategic partner when Generation Health has only been founded for a year. At the same time, Lofberg must recruit for the critical position of Chief Medical Officer while also making decisions about Generation Health's stance on various regulatory issues that will affect the industry long-term.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Entrepreneurship; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Growth and Development Strategy; Partners and Partnerships; Genetics; Health Industry; Insurance Industry;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Jeffrey D. Marrazzo, and Rachel Gordon. "Generation Health: A Pioneer in Genetics Benefit Management (A)." Harvard Business School Case 810-007, October 2009. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  20. Stan Lapidus: Profile of a Medical Entrepreneur

    Describes the career path and insights of Stanley Lapidus, a successful serial entrepreneur in the medical and life sciences industry. Lapidus is the founder of Cytyc Corp. (NASDAQ: CYTC) and EXACT Sciences (NASDAQ: EXAS) and is currently the CEO of his third start-up, Helicos BioSciences. Gives students insight into the skills and experiences that are helpful in building successful medical technology companies.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Experience and Expertise; Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Managerial Roles; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Sophie LaMontagne. "Stan Lapidus: Profile of a Medical Entrepreneur." Harvard Business School Case 805-087, December 2004. (Revised April 2014.) View Details
  21. iZumi

    Presents the issues faced while building an innovative company in an emerging space with new intellectual property from the perspective of a venture capitalist. Beth Seidenberg, a partner at the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), had helped create iZumi Bio, a company with ambitious prospects that she believed had the potential to become "the" definitive stem cell company. iZumi sought to bring under its banner key intellectual property (IP) from the nascent field of stem cell technology. As such, iZumi would need to acquire the rights to several groundbreaking scientific developments that had recently occurred in labs around the world. Seidenberg needed to decide whether to commit to the next major tranche of the investment. Charged with finalizing her decision in less than 24 hours, Seidenberg weighed the pros and cons of the next round of financing. Was it really possible to pull together such a broad range of IP under one umbrella? Was the international mix of IP going to be too difficult to manage? Was it too early for stem cell technology to be successfully commercialized?

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Globalized Markets and Industries; Innovation and Management; Intellectual Property; Rights; Genetics; Financial Services Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Jacob Ian Broder-Fingert, Eliot Sherman, and Sidhartha Palani. "iZumi." Harvard Business School Case 809-105, January 2009. (Revised July 2010.) View Details
  22. Pervasis Therapeutics, Inc.

    In May 2005, Steve Bollinger was about to become president and chief operating officer of Pervasis Therapeutics, a small cell therapy start-up in Cambridge, Mass. If proven successful, Pervasis' product, Vascugel, could change the way vascular disease is treated and have a major impact in a large and underserved population. However, Vascugel had not yet gone into human clinical trials, and getting it to market would mean navigating the FDA approval process, as well as raising the capital necessary to finance the endeavor. It was up to Bollinger to decide on a strategy for Vascugel's clinical trials. In addition, he would have to decide how much money the company needed to raise, taking into account the interests of the company's founders and existing venture investors. Finally, while Bollinger was expected to lead the company for the next two to three years, Pervasis' board was planning to launch a search for a permanent CEO in the future.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Venture Capital; Financial Strategy; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Health Industry; Cambridge;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Virginia Fuller. "Pervasis Therapeutics, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 807-026, December 2006. (Revised August 2008.) View Details
  23. NatuRi Corporation

    NatuRi Corporation was a start up, founded in 2005, aiming to manufacture a cholesterol-lowering drug made from the byproducts of rice bran oil production. With operations split between Chennai, India and Boston, Massachusetts, NatuRi faced several challenges, including securing funding for the organization. NatuRi had captured the attention of at least four potential investors willing to offer an investment. Its managers were challenged to weigh their options and to determine which of the four potential investors currently interested in their venture would be most appropriate for NatuRi's future growth. In addition, the founders had only a short period of time to decide whether or not to accept a Seed and Series A term sheet from a well known venture capital firm. Poses the question of how the company's financing should be structured and how much equity the founders should relinquish in exchange for the start-up capital.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Decision Choices and Conditions; Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Equity; Investment Funds; Growth and Development Strategy; Chennai; Boston;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., and Virginia Fuller. "NatuRi Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 807-027, January 2007. (Revised August 2008.) View Details
  24. Conor Medsystems

    Conor Medsystems had developed a drug-eluting stent that could capture significant share of the $5 billion global market. Chief executive officer, Frank Litvack, is considering alternative sources of financing to test the device.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Health Testing and Trials; Corporate Finance; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Sull, Donald N., Robert F. Higgins, Linda A. Cyr, and Bijan Salehizadeh. "Conor Medsystems." Harvard Business School Case 804-180, April 2004. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  25. Cynthia Fisher and the Rearing of ViaCell

    Describes the start up of Viacord, a Boston-based medical services firm founded by Cynthia Fisher (HBS MBA) in 1993. Told from Fisher's perspective, the entrepreneur details the conceptualization and launch of the business and the many obstacles and expenses faced in the company's first seven years. Fisher describes the venture capital negotiations and a merger with a biotech company that led to the creation of ViaCell in 2000. Fisher explains how her role changed from founder and CEO of Viacord to president and then board member of ViaCell, and carries the firm's story to the successful 2005 IPO.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Business Growth and Maturation; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Service Industry; Health Industry; Boston;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Ingrid Vargas. "Cynthia Fisher and the Rearing of ViaCell." Harvard Business School Case 806-002, December 2005. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  26. Note on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    Describes the U.S. FDA with particular emphasis on its role in the development of new drugs, biologic products, and medical devices today. Provides context for the drug approval process by describing the FDA's history and organizational structure.

    Keywords: Health; Governance Compliance; Policy; Product Development; Government and Politics; Pharmaceutical Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Biotechnology Industry; Public Administration Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Virginia Fuller. "Note on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration." Harvard Business School Background Note 807-050, January 2007. (Revised January 2007.) View Details
  27. Note on Biotech Business Development

    Describes the business development process in biotechnology companies. Topics covered include: participants in the licensing process and their interests, the major steps in the licensing process, the terms that are part of most agreements, and the most contentious issues that arise in the implementation of licensing agreements.

    Keywords: Agreements and Arrangements; Entrepreneurship; Intellectual Property; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Robert F. Higgins. "Note on Biotech Business Development." Harvard Business School Background Note 807-032, January 2007. View Details
  28. Grove International Partners

    Grove International Partners, one of the world's largest international real estate private equity funds, is actively seeking new investment opportunities in the seniors housing industry. The firm has identified two potential opportunities--one located in Japan and one in the United Kingdom--that would place it at the leading edge of one of the most lucrative and socially meaningful health care services markets in the world. Grove evaluates these two opportunities and decides which one, if either, to pursue.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Private Equity; Investment; Opportunities; Financial Services Industry; Health Industry; Japan; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Suzanne Petrela. "Grove International Partners." Harvard Business School Case 806-096, February 2006. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  29. Stan Lapidus: Profile of a Medical Entrepreneur (TN)

    Teaching Note to (805-087).

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Erin Seefeld. "Stan Lapidus: Profile of a Medical Entrepreneur (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-149, March 2006. View Details
  30. U.S. Labs

    Describes the evolution of a start-up venture in the pathology lab segment of the clinical lab business. U.S. Labs tries a series of business models before running out of cash. The company is in dire need of financing, as its venture capital backers are refusing to put up more capital and its bank is calling its loan. Discusses how the CEO is willing to put up his own funding and still believes in the company's future.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Venture Capital; Financial Strategy; Financing and Loans; Business Model; Business or Company Management; Planning; Business Strategy; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Roberts, Michael J., and Robert F. Higgins. "U.S. Labs." Harvard Business School Case 802-163, February 2002. (Revised May 2004.) View Details
      1. Received the 2008 Beatrice D. Ellerin Award from the HBS Health Industry Alumni. The prestigious and competitive Ellerin award recognizes an outstanding leader in the health care industry who has made a significant contribution to shaping her or his field.