Chapter | Business Ethics | 2013

Multinational Enterprises and Incomplete Institutions: The Demandingness of Minimum Moral Standards

by Nien-he Hsieh

Abstract

Multinational enterprises (MNEs) operate across countries that vary widely in their legal, political, and regulatory institutions. One question that arises is whether there are certain minimum standards that ought to guide managers in their decision making independently of local institutional requirements, especially when institutional arrangements are incomplete. This chapter examines what follows if managers recognize two kinds of duties of forbearance in their decision making that are commonly held to be among the most minimal of moral duties: the duty not to harm and the duty not to violate the liberty of others. The chapter concludes that the standards for MNEs may be more demanding than what the minimalist nature of duties of forbearance initially would suggest.

Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Decision Making; Standards;

Citation:

Hsieh, Nien-he. "Multinational Enterprises and Incomplete Institutions: The Demandingness of Minimum Moral Standards." In Business Ethics. 2nd ed. Edited by Michael Boylan, 409–422. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2013.