Chapter | The Globalization of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Environmental Policy | 2013

Assessing Potential Carbon Revenues from Reduced Forest Cover Loss in Liberia

by Jessica Donovan, Keith Lawrence, Christopher Neyor, Eduard Niesten and Eric Werker

Abstract

We conducted an analysis that explores the merits of a low-carbon development strategy for Liberia. This chapter describes both our cost-benefit analysis initiative and a plausible policy process for Liberia. We proposed a simple approach that models the costs and benefits of land placed under different uses. Policy scenarios then determine the amount of land under each land use and the implications for costs, benefits, and carbon emissions. A "low-carbon development strategy" for Liberia would include a number of cost beneficial policies, the most obvious being a transition to more efficient agriculture. Other beneficial policies include accelerating the establishment of Protected Areas, ensuring that tree crop plantations are located on degraded land rather than forest areas, and introducing energy-efficient stoves for charcoal and fuel wood.

Keywords: carbon revenue; Liberia; deforestation; climate change; Weather and Climate Change; Environmental Sustainability; Liberia;

Citation:

Donovan, Jessica, Keith Lawrence, Christopher Neyor, Eduard Niesten, and Eric Werker. "Assessing Potential Carbon Revenues from Reduced Forest Cover Loss in Liberia." Chap. 19 in The Globalization of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Environmental Policy, edited by Michael A. Livermore and Richard L. Revesz, 293–304. Oxford University Press, 2013.