Journal Article | Environmental History | October 2008

Risk Frameworks and Biomonitoring: Distributed Regulation of Synthetic Chemicals in Humans

by Arthur A. Daemmrich

Abstract

The ability to detect and measure the presence of synthetic chemicals at trace levels in humans coupled to increased environmental NGO mobilization concerning chemical exposure has challenged risk and regulatory frameworks built up over the past quarter-century. This article analyzes changing definitions of risk in U.S. environmental regulation and describes challenges posed by emerging detection techniques, government and NGO surveys of chemicals in citizens, and reduction of information asymmetries through the internet. A new framework for regulation is proposed involving a networked approach among industry, NGOs, and government regulators.

Keywords: Chemicals; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Risk Management; Natural Environment; Pollution and Pollutants; Non-Governmental Organizations; United States;

Citation:

Daemmrich, Arthur A. "Risk Frameworks and Biomonitoring: Distributed Regulation of Synthetic Chemicals in Humans." Environmental History 13, no. 4 (October 2008): 684–694.