2014-2015 course listings will be continually updated. Please check back regularly for updates.

Fall 2014

 
Research Development Course
Instructor: Michael Luca
4006
M 3:00-4:30
Baker Library │Bloomberg Center 102
The objective of this course is to provide a structured research experience in which students undertake a substantive research project while developing a systematic approach to the process of research. The course emphasizes strategies for successful development of research from the initial idea development stage through the completion of a paper. The course allows students to work on the second-year paper while building a supportive research community across the class where students will receive feedback from peers and learn to be good critics and discussants of others' research. This course is required of 2nd year doctoral students in Accounting and Management, Management, Marketing, Technology and Operations Management, and Strategy. Auditors are not permitted to register for this class.
 
Microeconomic Theory I
Instructor: Maciej Kotowski
4010
API-111/ECON 2020a
M W 8:30-10
HKS Littauer 230

A comprehensive course in economic theory designed for doctoral students in all parts of the university. Topics include consumption, production, behavior toward risk, markets, and general equilibrium theory. Also looks at applications to policy analysis, business decisions, industrial organization, finance, and the legal system. Undergraduates with appropriate background are welcome, subject to the instructor's approval.

While the class will regularly meet on Mondays and Wednesdays (8:30-10 a.m.) at HKS, the first day of class will be on Friday, September 5th (8:30-10 a.m.). The Friday session will meet in the class's regular room at the Kennedy School, Littauer 230. Prerequisite: Multivariate calculus and one course in probability theory. Thorough background in microeconomic theory at the intermediate level. Students may receive credit for both API-111 and API-101/API-105 only if API-101/105 is taken first. API-111 and API-109 cannot both be taken for credit. Also offered by Harvard Kennedy School as API-111 and the Economics Department as Econ 2020a.

 
The Foundations of Strategy
Instructor: Juan Alcacer
4110
M 1:30-4:30
Baker Library │Bloomberg Center 103
The course provides a broad, multi-disciplinary introduction to the study of business strategy, with a particular emphasis on its behavioral and economic foundations. Different schools of thought and their evolution will be analyzed, discussed and compared.
 
Psychology and Economic Theory
Instructor: Matthew Rabin
4155
Econ 2035
M 1-4
Aldrich 209
This course explores ways that psychological research indicating systematic departures from classical economic assumptions can be translated into formal models that can be incorporated into economics. Topics include ways utility theory can be improved--such as incorporating reference dependence, news utility, social preferences, self image, and other belief-based tastes--and ways we can relax assumptions of perfect rationality--such as incorporating focusing effects, limited attention, biased prediction of future tastes, present-biased preferences, biases in probabilistic judgment, and errors in social inference. The course will emphasize (a) careful interpretation and production of new evidence on relevant departures,(b) formalizing this evidence into models that can, with discipline and rigor, generate sharp predictions using traditional economic approaches, and (c) exploring economic implications of those models presented. Although we will primarily emphasize (b), the course is meant to be useful to students whose interests lie anywhere in this spectrum, under the premise that all such research will be improved by a greater appreciation of the full spectrum. The course is intended for PhD students in the Business Economics and Economics programs and others who have a solid background in microeconomic theory at the level of introductory PhD courses in these programs. While obviously appropriate to those wishing to specialize in "behavioral economics", the course is also designed for those interested in doing research in particular fields of economics. And while the course centers on theoretical models (learning and evaluation will center around solving formal problem sets), the theory is focused towards its empirical implementability and economic relevance, so that the course is also designed for those interested in theory-influenced empirical research.
 
Asset Pricing
Instructor: John Campbell
4209
Econ 2723
Tu Th 2:30-4:00
First half is an introduction to financial economics emphasizing discrete-time models and empirical applications. Reviews basic asset pricing theory. Second half deals with theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of financial markets using psychological or behavioral ideas.
 
Research Seminar in Nonverbal Behavior, Social Perception, and Psychophysiology
Instructor: Amy J.C. Cuddy
4422
Psy 2661r
TBD
Students will gain human subject research skills and experience in the lab and online. We will cover a range of topics in social psychology, including but not limited to: nonverbal behavior, social perception, personal power, hormones, emotions, and performance in stressful situations. In biweekly meetings, students will have the opportunity to provide and receive feedback on the work of the lab as well as discuss relevant papers. In addition, monthly trainings will be held covering research tools such as eye-trackers, physiological measures, Qualtrics, and Mechanical Turk.

Prerequisites: Science of Living Systems 20 plus one from Psychology 13, 15, 16, 18, Science B 29 or MCB 80.
 
Behavioral Insights Group Research Seminar
Instructor: Francesca Gino and Todd Rogers
4425
PSY 2553R
Tu 1-2
Baker Library │Bloomberg Center 475

This seminar provides lab experience in behavioral approaches to decision making and negotiation.

This lab will meet from 1-2pm on the following Tuesdays: September 23 and 30, October 7 and 28, November 4 and 25, and December 2.

This seminar was previously called the Decision Making and Negotiation: Research Seminar.

Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Psychology 2553r.

 
Organizational Behavior Lab
4427
Th 9-11
Baker Library│ Bloomberg Center 101
OB lab is a doctoral workshop that meets every other week for 1.5 hours. Students are expected to present their work and attend the other sessions to provide feedback to other members.
 
Experimental Methods for Behavioral Research
4435
Psy 2653
M 11:30-2:45
Baker Library │Bloomberg Center 102
This course is aimed at doctoral students who intend to conduct experimental research studying individuals’ behavior in business (e.g., marketing, organizational behavior) and related disciplines (e.g., psychology). The primary objective of the course is to provide students with the concepts and tools needed for planning and executing laboratory experiments, and for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. The course will also discuss other methodologies that may be helpful when working with field sites (namely, field experiments and surveys). A secondary objective is to provide students with the foundations for the methodological evaluation of other behavioral researchers’ work – a skill that will be helpful in their future role as academic reviewers. The course thus covers the designs and analyses that are most often used by experimental researchers in psychology, organizational behavior, and marketing. The course will be hands-on and oriented towards providing technical skills for the design and implementation of experiments, including overcoming possible pitfalls and common barriers. The final course assignment will be for students to write a proposal outlining the theory, design, power analyses, and proposed statistical analysis strategy for an experiment. The hope is that students will conduct the research during the course or afterwards, and that the course will help students to produce rigorous and impactful behavioral research. Please note that the course will begin on Monday, September 8th.
 
Business History Seminar
Instructor: Walter A. Friedman
4810
Tu 1-4
Baker Library │ Bloomberg Center 101
This course provides a comparative approach to the historical process of industrialization and modernization in the West and Asia, drawing specifically on the examples of China, Japan, the United States and Western Europe. Starting from the mid-19th century to the present, this course will explore the economic, technological, cultural and political dimensions of economic growth and business development. Among the topics covered are the causes of wealth and poverty, the nature and impact of globalization, knowledge creation and transfer, the emergence of modern management, government policies, and the cultural transformation of societies. Each meeting will discuss the key literature by authors in the field, and explore and test the premises on which their works are based. The overall aim of the course is to introduce graduate students to central issues and theoretical discourses in the broad field of business history, and to explore the relevance of this literature to other disciplines. The course provides a unique opportunity to develop research skills through designing, researching and writing a paper using original sources, either quantitative or qualitative. Students will work closely with one of the instructors during the semester on this paper.
 
Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research
Instructor: Leslie A. Perlow
4852
This seminar provides a forum to demystify the craft of qualitative inductive research. How do field notes get transformed into published books and articles? How does theory get built and substantiated? What is the behind the scenes process successful scholars are using? Our goal is to look behind the curtain and understand the art and science of writing up this work. It is also to gain an appreciation for the variety of ways in which people work. Towards this end, the seminar will be composed of two parts: 1) learning from others and 2) learning by doing. The first part of each class will involve uncovering the story behind a published piece of work, written by a leading scholar. The second part of each class will involve class participants sharing their own writing based on on-going research projects. This writing can take the form of full paper or much earlier stage memos, outlines or other writing sample. The seminar is offered as a Pass/Fail course and has three requirements: In preparation for each class, participants will read the piece of work by the leading scholar, and possibly some earlier drafts, memos, or reviews. For each class, participants will also be provided a writing sample distributed by one of the class participant, whose week it is to share their work. Participants will be responsible for sharing their work during at least one class session. This course is open to doctoral students who have successfully completed their first-year of graduate work and are engaged in inductive qualitative research projects ideally with data. Permission of the instructors is required for all enrollees. Schedule:
Friday, September 19 from 1:00-4:00 in Cotting House 107;
Friday, October 3 from 1:00-4:00 in Cotting House 107;
Friday, November 21 from 9-5 in Cotting House 107;
Friday, December 12 from 9-5 in Cotting House 107.
 
Micro Topics in Organizational Behavior
4882
M 3-6
Cumnock 101B
Micro Topics in Organizational Behavior is a survey course covering the study of individual, dyadic, small group and intra-organizational behavior, with special focus on research by Harvard Faculty. At the individual level, examples of possible topics include cognitive psychology, behavioral decision theory, motivation theory, and the study of attitudes and emotions. At the dyadic level, examples include negotiation, social perceptions, relationships and supervisor-subordinate ties. Teams, multiparty decision making and coalitions are possible topics at the group level. Examples of potential topics at the intra-organizational level include conflict, culture, person-organization fit, psychological contracts, justice and power. Most sessions will include a broad discussion of a topic, followed by a more focused discussion with a faculty member about her or his research in the area.
 

Spring 2015

 
Research Development Course
Instructor: Michael Luca
4006
M 3-4:30
The objective of this course is to provide a structured research experience in which students undertake a substantive research project while developing a systematic approach to the process of research. The course emphasizes strategies for successful development of research from the initial idea development stage through the completion of a paper. The course allows students to work on the second-year paper while building a supportive research community across the class where students will receive feedback from peers and learn to be good critics and discussants of others' research. This course is required of 2nd year doctoral students in Accounting and Management, Management, Marketing, Technology and Operations Management, and Strategy. Auditors are not permitted to register for this class.
 
Perspectives on Research in Organizations (formerly Perspectives in Management Research)
Instructor: Kathleen L. McGinn
4008
W 10-1
Cumnock Hall 230
Exposes students to cutting edge research across a spectrum of management functions and demonstrates how various types of research contributes to management questions. This course is required of 1st year doctoral students in Accounting, Health Policy Management, Management, Marketing, Technology and Operations Management, and Strategy.
 
Microeconomic Theory II
Instructor: Elon Kohlberg and Sandeep Baliga
4011
ECON 2020B/HKS API 112
M W 8:30-10

A continuation of Economics 2020a. This course covers game theory, economics of information, incentive theory, and welfare economics.

Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2020b and the Kennedy School as KSG API-112.

 
Design of Field Research Methods
Instructor: Robin J. Ely
4070
Th 3-6
Morgan Hall 350
Field research involves collecting original data (qualitative or quantitative) in field sites. The course will combine informal lecture and discussion with practical sessions designed to build specific skills for conducting field research in organizations. Readings include books and papers about research methodology, as well as articles that provide exemplars of field research, including both theory driven and phenomenon driven work. Specific topics covered include variance versus process models, blending qualitative and quantitative data (in one paper, one study, or one career), collecting and analyzing different kinds of data (observation interview, survey, archival), levels of analysis, construct development, and writing up field research for publication. A core aim of the course is to help students understand the contingent relationship between the nature of the research question and the field research methods used to answer it, and to use this understanding to design and carry out original field research. Course requirements include several short assignments assessing readings and a final paper designed to help students' further their own field research goals. This seminar fulfills a requirement for HBS Organizational Behavior and Management students. Students are required to be in or beyond their second year of study. Other students permitted by permission of the instructor.
 
Empirical Methods in Financial Economics (formerly Empirical Methods in Corporate Finance)
4220
ECON 2727
M 2:30-5:30
Cumnock 230

Examines empirical research in corporate finance. Covers empirical research methodology, financial institutions, and financial policy. Major emphasis is on how to do well-executed and persuasive research in corporate finance. Seminar format; students write referee reports and a research paper.

Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2727. Structured to minimize overlap with Economics 2725.

 
Corporate Finance and Banking
4243
ECON 2725
Tu Th 10:00-11:30
Cumnock 230

Theory and empirical evidence of capital structure, dividends, investment policy, managerial incentives and takeovers. Topics include market efficiency, agency problems and ownership.

This course was previously called Corporate Finance

Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2725.

 
Empirical Research in Corporate Valuation, Reporting and Governance
Instructor: George Serafeim
4254
Tu 2-5pm
Morgan 450
This course is a survey of research in corporate valuation, reporting and governance intended for doctoral students. The primary purpose of the course is to introduce fundamental research themes and methodologies used to address questions related to valuation, reporting and governance. Participants will become acquainted with the relevant literature through classroom discussions of assigned readings, paper summaries, problem sets, and individual research proposals. Moreover, the course will introduce new opportunities for scholars to conduct research in the domains of valuation, reporting and governance.
 
Theoretical & Empirical Perspectives on Entrepreneurship
Instructor: William R. Kerr and Josh Lerner
4350
ECON 2726
Th 2:30-5:30
Baker Library│ Bloomberg Center 103

Entrepreneurship--the formation and growth of new firms--is a complex phenomenon that has historically attracted relatively little academic attention. In recent years, however, scholars in a variety of disciplines have been devoting increasing attention to this topic. This course will explore the emerging work in this dynamic area. Reflecting the complex nature of the entrepreneurship, the course will touch on literature in a variety of academic disciplines, but the readings will primarily focus on discipline-oriented research from an economics, finance, and sociological perspective. Students taking the course for credit will be expected to complete two referee reports and a paper.

Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2726.

 
Management Control and Performance Measurement
Instructor: Ian D. Gow
4403
M 10:00-1
Morgan 450
This course is a research seminar for doctoral students and faculty interested in studying control issues from an Economics perspective. Agency models, with moral hazard and adverse selection features, will be applied to settings in auditing, supply-chains, and managerial performance evaluation. Use of Accounting information for belief-revision and performance-evaluation will be studied using both empirical and analytical methodologies. The trade-off between these two uses of accounting information will also be covered. Problem sets, a research proposal, and class participation will be the primary mode of evaluation. Prior exposure to graduate level microeconomics and econometrics is required.
 
Behavioral Insights Group Research Seminar
Instructor: Francesca Gino and Todd Rogers
4425
Psy 2553r
Hours to be arranged.

This seminar provides lab experience in behavioral approaches to decision making and negotiation.

This seminar was previously called the Decision Making and Negotiation: Research Seminar.

Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Psychology 2553r.

 
Organizational Behavior Lab
4428
Th 9-11
Baker Library│ Bloomberg Center 101
OB lab is a doctoral workshop that meets every other week for 1.5 hours. Students are expected to present their work and attend the other sessions to provide feedback to other members.
 
Field Experiments
Instructor: 
4430
TBD
This course is for doctoral students who want to learn how to design and run field experiments as a research methodology. The objective is for students to refine their own experimental designs and be able to run them by the end of the course, leading to an academic paper. The course will be hands-on and oriented towards providing technical skills for the design and implementation of field experiments, including overcoming the many possible associated pitfalls. We will examine in-depth examples of how field experiments are designed, implemented and analyzed, including the "back story" of several published field experiments. We will also discuss at length throughout the course how to use field experiments to test academic theory as opposed to only for policy/impact evaluation. The last third of the course is dedicated to introducing and studying particularly fruitful areas for research using field experiments and to students' presentations of their own research ideas. Advanced MBAs, MPPs, and MPA-IDS, who want to learn the technical skills of running and managing a field experiment, for the purpose of conducting randomized impact evaluations of innovative programs in the companies and NGOs that they will be part of and/or advising, will be allowed to take the course upon permission of the instructor. The course assignment will be a completed proposal (of approximately 15 pages) outlining the theory and design for the field experiment, and a completed IRB application for human subjects approval.
 
Marketing Models
Instructor: Elie Ofek
4660
F 2-5
This course is designed to help satisfy the requirements of the DBA program in marketing at HBS. The course on Marketing Models will review the extant literature in the field of marketing models with special attention to pricing and promotions, sales force management, channels of distribution (retail and industrial), new product development and marketing planning and strategy. The course will use the book by Lilien, Kotler and Moorthy as a starting point and cover most of these issues through a set of current working and published papers that will have both a theoretical and empirical content to them. As the class reviews this literature, the focus will be on important problems and identify potential areas that remain under researched in the literature.
 
DBA Seminar for Technology and Operations Management
Instructor: Michael W. Toffel
4840
Th 11:30-1:00
Morgan 350
This seminar provides a forum to provide feedback to TOM DBA students on their emerging and ongoing research projects. The seminar also seeks to bolster research collaboration among TOM DBA students and between them and TOM faculty. The seminar is offered as a Pass/Fail course and has three requirements: 1) Presenters will distribute to the students and faculty their working paper by 9am Wednesday, the day before their presentation; 2) Each student will present his or her work during one of the seminar sessions, leaving ample time for discussion throughout the presentation; and 3) Students will actively engage as audience members to provide constructive feedback to the presenter.
 
Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research II
Instructor: Leslie A. Perlow
4853
TBD
This seminar is a continuation of the Seminar on the Craft of Qualitative Inductive Research. How do field notes get transformed into published books and articles? How does theory get built and substantiated? What is the behind the scenes process successful scholars are using? Our goal is to look behind the curtain and understand the art and science of writing up this work. It is also to gain an appreciation for the variety of ways in which people work.
 
Macro Topics in Organizational Behavior: Organization and Management Theory Seminar
Instructor: Michael L. Tushman
4880
F 9-12
Cumnock 220
This doctoral seminar explores fundamental aspects of organizations and organization theory. This seminar will cover various approaches to organizations and the institutional contexts within which they operate. We will pay particular attention to innovation and differential organizational outcomes, and the role (and limits) of agency within the firm and in institutional contexts. We will also discuss organization and management theory in the context of today’s society. In particular, we will explore the impact of sharply decreased communication and information processing costs on organizations and industries. This course is for students interested in understanding and, in turn, conducting research on macro-organizational topics. As research in organizations, institutions, and innovation areas are contested terrains, after moving through the basics we will focus on contentious and unresolved issues. Our seminar will improve your ability to be a critical consumer of organizational and institutional research. It will also sharpen your ability to build mid-range theory and to connect your concepts to empirical research. During the term we will focus on a range of inter-related topics, including identity, organization design, senior teams, power and politics, social networks, innovation, organizational evolution, and institutional dynamics. These topics will be considered across levels of analysis and disciplinary boundaries and students will be encouraged to develop their own cross- boundary ideas. Finally, students will develop their own research proposal and present it to the community in our last class.
 

For the Harvard University Course Catalog