The HBS Doctoral Course Catalog is a list of doctoral courses offered by HBS over the past four years.

    • 4001

    Management and Markets: Administration and Human Behavior

    Last Offered: FA 2011
    Last Taught By: Rakesh Khurana and Amy J.C. Cuddy

    The first part of this course will expose students to the classic works in administrative theory, as well as more recent work on organizational processes, the management of change and the management of technology. In the second part, the course will cover theories of human motivation and human interaction from numerous perspectives. It will include psychological, sociological, and economic theories of motivation, as well as normative and positive theories.

 
    • 4003

    Management and Markets: Organizational Economics and Finance

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: Dennis A. Yao, N/A, and Belen Villalonga

    This course will cover the foundations of corporate strategy and organizational design as informed by industrial and organizational economics. In the second part, the class will look at the functioning of modern capital markets and the interactions of firms within this market.

 
    • 4006

    Research Development Course

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Michael Luca

    The objective of this course is to provide a structured research experience in which students undertake a substantive research project while developing a systematic approach to the process of research. The course emphasizes strategies for successful development of research from the initial idea development stage through the completion of a paper. The course allows students to work on the second-year paper while building a supportive research community across the class where students will receive feedback from peers and learn to be good critics and discussants of others' research. This course is required of 2nd year doctoral students in Accounting and Management, Management, Marketing, Technology and Operations Management, and Strategy. Auditors are not permitted to register for this class

 
 
    • 4008

    Perspectives on Research in Organizations (formerly Perspectives in Management Research)

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: John T. Gourville and Dennis A. Yao

    Exposes students to cutting edge research across a spectrum of management functions and demonstrates how various types of research contributes to management questions.

 
    • 4008

    Perspectives on Research in Organizations (formerly Perspectives in Management Research)

    Last Taught By: Kathleen L. McGinn

 
    • 4110

    The Foundations of Strategy

    Last Offered: FA 2014
    Last Taught By: Juan Alcacer

    The course provides a broad, multi-disciplinary introduction to the study of business strategy, with a particular emphasis on its behavioral and economic foundations. Different schools of thought and their evolution will be analyzed, discussed and compared.

 
    • 4150

    Market Design

    Last Offered: FA 2011
    Last Taught By: Peter Coles and Alvin E. Roth

    This course deals with the theory and practice of market design, with prominent examples drawn from auctions and labor markets.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2056.

 
    • 4160

    Experimental Economics

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Amrin Falk

    An introduction to experimental economics, and some of the major subject areas that have been addressed by laboratory experiments. We concentrate on series of experiments, to see how experiments build on one another.

    Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2040.

 
    • 4180

    Organizational Economics

    Last Offered: WI 2009
    Last Taught By: George P. Baker and Oliver Hart

    Theoretical and empirical work on organizations. Topics include agency problems inside organizations, boundaries of the firm, relational contracting, authority, hierarchies, delegation, decentralization, and nonstandard organizational arrangements (including joint ventures, venture capital, and public ownership).

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2670.

 
    • 4209

    Asset Pricing I

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: John Campbell

    First half is an introduction to financial economics emphasizing discrete-time models and empirical applications. Reviews basic asset pricing theory. Second half deals with theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of financial markets using psychological or behavioral ideas.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2723.

 
    • 4250

    Empirical Research in Financial Reporting and Corporate Governance (formerly Empirical Research in Financial Reporting and Analysis)

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Suraj Srinivasan

    This course is a survey of financial accounting research intended for doctoral students. The primary purpose of the course is to introduce fundamental research themes and methodologies used in empirical financial accounting research. Participants will become acquainted with the relevant literature through classroom discussions of assigned readings, paper summaries, problem sets, and individual research proposals.

 
    • 4251

    Accounting and Management Research Workshop

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Charles C.Y. Wang

    The objectives of this course are 1) to stimulate critical evaluation of current research in financial and managerial accounting; 2) to build critical skills to be an effective presenter and discussant; and 3) to facilitate students' own research. The workshop will cover A&M seminar papers as well as students' research-in-progress.

 
    • 4340

    The Role of the Corporation in Society

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: Robert G. Eccles and George Serafeim

    Classical financial economic theory defines the role of the corporation to be shareholder value maximization. According to this view, meeting the needs of other stakeholders along social and environmental dimensions should only be done if it contributes to creating shareholder value. Making these decisions assumes that the information is available for doing the necessary analysis and that management and shareholders have the same risk profiles and time frames for value creation. However, this classic view of the corporation is coming under pressure as the government and civil society are increasingly interested in the role companies should play in contributing to environmental and social sustainability. They are essentially arguing for a multi-stakeholder view which does not take the primacy of one particular type of stakeholder, shareholders, as a given. Others argue that, with a sufficiently long-term view, no tradeoffs need to be made since value can only be created for shareholders if the company is not destroying value for other stakeholders. Globalization, recurring crises in the world's capital markets, and the failure of companies to adequately manage risk are also contributing to a growing debate about the role corporations should have in society today. We are at the early stages of even framing the discussion. The purpose of this doctoral seminar is to first put some structure to the debate and second to pose alternative models to the dominant one in place today. The seminar is a broad and interdisciplinary one with readings from a variety of fields and disciplines. Each student will write a paper on a topic of their choice that is intended to help them set a research agenda that will lead to a published article in a refereed journal.

 
    • 4350

    Theoretical & Empirical Perspectives on Entrepreneurship

    Last Offered: WI 2015
    Last Taught By: William R. Kerr and Josh Lerner

    Entrepreneurship--the formation and growth of new firms--is a complex phenomenon that has historically attracted relatively little academic attention. In recent years, however, scholars in a variety of disciplines have been devoting increasing attention to this topic. This course will explore the emerging work in this dynamic area. Reflecting the complex nature of the entrepreneurship, the course will touch on literature in a variety of academic disciplines, but the readings will primarily focus on discipline-oriented research from an economics, finance, and sociological perspective. Students taking the course for credit will be expected to complete two referee reports and a paper.

    Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2726.

 
    • 4355

    Sociological and Organizational Perspectives in Entrepreneurship Research

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: Mary Tripsas

    The aim of the course is to survey the contemporary organization theory and sociology literature as it relates to phenomena that are of central interest to scholars of entrepreneurship. Broadly, research on entrepreneurship examines factors that affect the identification, evaluation and exploitation of opportunities, especially concerning the creation of new organizations. Insofar as there is a central theme in the readings in the course, it is that an actor's social position is a critical influence on the likelihood that he, she or it (when the actor is an organization) will engage in entrepreneurial activity. This course is offered as a half-course.

 
    • 4403

    Management Control and Performance Measurement

    Last Offered: FA 2014
    Last Taught By: Dennis Campbell

 
    • 4420

    Behavioral Approaches to Decision Making and Negotiation

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Francesca Gino

    This course will provide a research overview of the field of behavioral decision making and decision analytic perspectives to negotiation. A core focus of the course will be the individual as a less than perfect decision making in individual and competitive contexts. On the decision making side, we will start with March and Simon's (1958) work on bounded rationality, work through the groundbreaking research of Kahneman and Tversky, and update this line of inquiry through the turn of the millennium. On the negotiation side, we will start with Raiffa's (1982) critical work on the interaction of prescriptive and descriptive research on negotiation, continue through the development of a behavioral decision perspective to negotiation, and examine how the field is currently evolving. We will examine the implications of imperfect behavior for theoretical development, as well as for how to train individuals to make wiser decisions.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Psychology 2650.

 
    • 4422

    Research Seminar in Nonverbal Behavior, Social Perception, and Psychophysiology

    Last Offered: FA 2014
    Last Taught By: Amy J.C. Cuddy

 
    • 4430

    Field Experiments

    Last Offered: WI 2013
    Last Taught By: N.Ashraf

    This course is for doctoral students who want to learn how to design and run field experiments as a research methodology. The objective is for students to refine their own experimental designs and be able to run them by the end of the course, leading to an academic paper. The course will be hands-on and oriented towards providing technical skills for the design and implementation of field experiments, including overcoming the many possible associated pitfalls. We will examine in-depth examples of how field experiments are designed, implemented and analyzed, including the "back story" of several published field experiments. We will also discuss at length throughout the course how to use field experiments to test academic theory as opposed to only for policy/impact evaluation. The last third of the course is dedicated to introducing and studying particularly fruitful areas for research using field experiments and to students' presentations of their own research ideas. Advanced MBAs, MPPs, and MPA-IDS, who want to learn the technical skills of running and managing a field experiment, for the purpose of conducting random mized impact evaluations of innovative programs in the companies and NGOs that they will be part of and/or advising, will be allowed to take the course upon permission of the instructor. The course assignment will be a completed proposal (of approximately 15 pages) outlining the theory and design for the field experiment, and a completed IRB application for human subjects approval.

 
    • 4435

    Experimental Methods for Behavioral Research

    Last Offered: FA 2014
    Last Taught By: Francesca GinoAmy J.C. Cuddy, and John Beshears

    This course is aimed at doctoral students who intend to conduct experimental research studying individuals’ behavior in business (e.g., marketing, organizational behavior) and related disciplines (e.g., psychology). The primary objective of the course is to provide students with the concepts and tools needed for planning and executing laboratory experiments, and for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. The course will also discuss other methodologies that may be helpful when working with field sites (namely, field experiments and surveys). A secondary objective is to provide students with the foundations for the methodological evaluation of other behavioral researchers’ work – a skill that will be helpful in their future role as academic reviewers. The course thus covers the designs and analyses that are most often used by experimental researchers in psychology, organizational behavior, and marketing. The course will be hands-on and oriented towards providing technical skills for the design and implementation of experiments, including overcoming possible pitfalls and common barriers. The final course assignment will be for students to write a proposal outlining the theory, design, power analyses, and proposed statistical analysis strategy for an experiment. The hope is that students will conduct the research during the course or afterwards, and that the course will help students to produce rigorous and impactful behavioral research. Please note that the course will begin on Monday, September 8th.

 
    • 4460

    Advanced Optimization

    Last Offered: FA 2011
    Last Taught By: 

    This is a graduate level course on optimization which provides a foundation for applications such as statistical machine learning, signal processing, finance, and approximation algorithms. The course will cover fundamental concepts in optimization theory, modeling, and algorithmic techniques for solving large-scale optimization problems. Topics include elements of convex analysis, linear programming, Lagrangian duality, optimality conditions, and discrete and combinatorial optimization. Exercises and the class project will involve developing and implementing optimization algorithms. Note: Offered jointly with the Business School as 4460. Prerequisites: Applied Mathematics 21b or Mathematics 21b (linear algebra) and Applied Mathematics 121 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Comfort with programming.

 
    • 4465

    Stochastic Modeling

    Last Offered: WI 2013
    Last Taught By: Nikolaos Trichakis and Joel Goh

    The course covers the modeling, analysis and control of stochastic systems. Topics include Bernoulli and Poisson processes, Markov chains and Markov decision processes, optimization under uncertainty, queuing theory, and simulation. Applications will be presented in production planning, inventory management, service systems, and sports.

 
    • 4480

    Theory of Operations Management

    Last Offered: FA 2012
    Last Taught By: Nikolaos Trichakis and Ananth Raman

    This course introduces students to the academic literature and current problems in Operations Management as well as classic Harvard Business Review articles that substantially affected the way managers thought about operations management. The seminar will cover topics such as production scheduling, inventory systems, supply chain management, new product development, and processes for and consequences of particular operational performance. Management of the supply chain, and the mathematical models that may be used to describe supply chain operational decisions, are one emphasis of the course. Enrollment limited to students planning to run a field experiment soon.

 
    • 4482

    Empirical Technology and Operations Management

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Ryan W. Buell

    Empirical methods are becoming increasingly prevalent in the Operations and Innovation fields as researchers strive to reconcile extant theory with practice. This workshop will expose students to the fields' most integral experimental and quasi-experimental approaches. Weekly readings will highlight the application of particular techniques and the theory behind them. Through discussion with various TOM faculty who are experts on each topic, students will develop an understanding about what each method does, why it works, when to use it, and how it would apply in their own research.

 
    • 4561

    Empirical Studies of Innovation and Digitization

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: S.Greenstein and Karim R. Lakhani

    Empirical Studies of Innovation and Digitization

 
    • 4630

    Doctoral Seminar on Consumer Behavior

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: John T. Gourville and Leslie K. John

    This course will provide a research overview of the field of consumer behavior and consumer decision making. Drawing principally from research papers from the fields of economics, psychology, and sociology, the course will cover topics including preferences, persuasion, learning, and decision making. Students will be expected to prepare the readings, critically critique the research, and actively participate in discussions. An exploratory research paper will be required for completion of the course.

 
    • 4660

    Marketing Models

    Last Offered: WI 2015
    Last Taught By: Elie Ofek

 
    • 4720

    The Economics of International Business

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: N/A

    The goal of this seminar is to introduce doctoral students to the field of international business. While economics forms the disciplinary foundation of the course, we will also compare and contrast other approaches from sociology, political science, and social psychology. At the end of this course, students should have developed the ability to evaluate various empirical approaches in the field. Finally, students should also end the course with a well-defined research proposal. This proposal will include a theoretical question, a literature review, an evaluation of the available data sources, and a plan for gathering any additional data necessary to answer the theoretical question.

    We begin the course by reviewing the key theoretical ideas that launched the field of international business. The rest of the course, addressing both theoretical and empirical issues, will examine cross-country issues including the literatures on multinationals, economic geography, and FDI. The course also examines within-country issues including comparative institutional analysis and the origin and persistence of differences in the business environments across countries. The course thus develops a perspective on the extent to which firm choices and managerial behavior are universal as opposed to context-dependent.

    Prerequisite: Economics 2010a or the equivalent.

 
    • 4809

    Seminar in Applied Statistical Methods

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: W. Simpson

    This course covers statistical methods and models used in management research. The focus will be on hands-on data analysis, including choosing appropriate models, understanding the assumptions and limitations of the models, and interpreting results. The course is designed for students who are already working on their own empirical research projects. Topics will be chosen from methods and models relevant to course participants' own research.

 
    • 4825

    Innovation and Organizations

    Last Offered: FA 2010
    Last Taught By: Michael L. Tushman

    This doctoral seminar will explore the relations between innovation, organization designs, executive leadership, and organization evolution. We will explore the diverse literatures on the nature of innovation patterns as product/service classes evolve. We then explore the relations between organization designs and innovation outcomes. We conclude with an exploration of the role of senior teams in shaping organizational designs and organizational fate as product classes evolve. We will explore when and under what conditions organizational action shapes patterns of innovation.

 
    • 4865

    Management Topics in Sustainability and Design

    Last Offered: WI 2010
    Last Taught By: Robert G. Eccles and Amy C. Edmondson

    This doctoral seminar is focused on identifying ideas on how to transform the U.S. design and construction sector so that that the structures it produces satisfy high standards in economic, design and sustainability outcomes. Buildings account for more than 35% of CO2 emissions and thus affect the sustainability of our society from an environmental perspective. The built environment also has more general sustainability implications for other environmental issues, like water, and social issues, like its affect on the surrounding community and the quality and productivity of the people who work in it. This built environment is the result of a design and construction industry which has seen relatively little change over the past 50 years. It is inefficient, often misses its deadlines, is rife with conflict and produces buildings and other structures that are far from sustainable in many definitions of the term. While most industries have undergone dramatic transformations over the years-variously driven by new technologies, changing customer demands and laws and regulations-this has not occurred here. In order to do this, we will explore a wide range of literature from the fields of organizational behavior, sociology, economics, strategy and design. Readings will include academic articles, HBS and other teaching cases, the occasional article from a business or design professional publication, and books and book chapters. About half of the classes, mostly towards the end, will have industry experts/practitioners as guests who are involved in various initiatives to develop a new and better model for design and construction. Students will be expected to spend some time in the field. The final paper will be on a topic mutually agreed upon between the student and the professor. Broad examples include a general theory of industry transformation, an analysis of a specific industry transformation with lessons to the design and construction sector, an analysis of the transformation of the design and construction sector in another country with lessons to the U.S., and how public policy can lead to industry transformation. Many other topics are possible. Every student will be responsible for co-leading the class discussions with the professor.

 
    • HBS 4006

    Research Development Course

    Last Taught By: 

 
    • HBS 4006

    Research Development Course

    Last Taught By: Michael Luca

 
    • HBS 4008

    Perspectives in Management Research

    Last Taught By: Daniel Malter

 
    • HBS 4010

    Microeconomic Theory I

    Last Offered: FA 2015
    Last Taught By: Christopher Avery

    A comprehensive course in economic theory designed for doctoral students in all parts of the university. Topics include consumption, production, behavior toward risk, markets, and general equilibrium theory. Also looks at applications to policy analysis, business decisions, industrial organization, finance, and the legal system. Undergraduates with appropriate background are welcome, subject to the instructor's approval.

    While the class will regularly meet on Mondays and Wednesday (8:30-10 a.m.) at HKS, the first day of class will be on Friday, September 6, 2013 (8:30-10 a.m.). The Friday session will meet in the class's regular room, L-230. Prerequisite: Multivariate calculus and one course in probability theory. Thorough background in microeconomic theory at the intermediate level. Students may receive credit for both API-111 and API-101/API-105 only if API-101/105 is taken first. API-111 and API-109 cannot both be taken for credit. Also offered by Harvard Kennedy School as API-111 and the Economics Department as Econ 2020a.

    Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2020a and the Kennedy School as KSG API-111.

 
    • HBS 4010

    Microeconomic Theory I

    Last Taught By: Maciej Kotowski

 
    • HBS 4011

    Microeconomic Theory II

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Elon Kohlberg and Christopher Avery

    A continuation of Economics 2020a. This course covers game theory, economics of information, incentive theory, and welfare economics.

    Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2020b and the Kennedy School as KSG API-112.

 
    • HBS 4011

    Microeconomic Theory II

    Last Taught By: Christopher N. Avery and Elon Kohlberg

 
    • HBS 4070

    Design of Field Research Methods

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Robin J. Ely

    Field research involves collecting original data (qualitative or quantitative) in field sites. The course will combine informal lecture and discussion with practical sessions designed to build specific skills for conducting field research in organizations. Readings include books and papers about research methodology, as well as articles that provide exemplars of field research, including both theory driven and phenomenon driven work. Specific topics covered include variance versus process models, blending qualitative and quantitative data (in one paper, one study, or one career), collecting and analyzing different kinds of data (observation interview, survey, archival), levels of analysis, construct development, and writing up field research for publication. A core aim of the course is to help students understand the contingent relationship between the nature of the research question and the field research methods used to answer it, and to use this understanding to design and carry out original field research. Course requirements include several short assignments assessing readings and a final paper designed to help students' further their own field research goals. This seminar fulfills a requirement for HBS Organizational Behavior and Management students. Students are required to be in or beyond their second year of study. Other students permitted by permission of the instructor.

 
    • HBS 4070

    Design of Field Research Methods

    Last Taught By: N/A

 
    • HBS 4110

    Foundations of Strategy

    Last Taught By: Juan Alcacer

 
    • HBS 4155

    Psychology and Economic Theory

    Last Taught By: Matthew Rabin

 
    • HBS 4160

    Experimental Economics

    Last Taught By: Amrin Falk

 
    • HBS 4209

    Asset Pricing I

    Last Taught By: John Y. Campbell

 
    • HBS 4209

    Asset Pricing

    Last Taught By: John Campbell

 
    • HBS 4220

    Empirical Methods in Financial Economics (formerly Empirical Methods in Corporate Finance)

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Samuel G. HansonVictoria Ivashina, and Adi Sunderam

    Examines empirical research in corporate finance. Covers empirical research methodology, financial institutions, and financial policy. Major emphasis is on how to do well-executed and persuasive research in corporate finance. Seminar format; students write referee reports and a research paper.

    Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2727. Structured to minimize overlap with Economics 2725.

 
 
    • HBS 4243

    Corporate Finance and Banking

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: David S. Scharfstein and Jeremy C. Stein

    Theory and empirical evidence of capital structure, dividends, investment policy, managerial incentives and takeovers. Topics include market efficiency, agency problems and ownership.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2725.

 
 
    • HBS 4250

    Empirical Research in Financial Reporting and Corporate Governance

    Last Taught By: Suraj Srinivasan

 
    • HBS 4251

    Accounting & Management Research Workshop

    Last Taught By: Charles C.Y. Wang

 
    • HBS 4251

    Accounting and Management Research Workshop

    Last Offered: FA 2015
    Last Taught By: Charles C.Y. Wang

    The objectives of this course are 1) to stimulate critical evaluation of current research in financial and managerial accounting; 2) to build critical skills to be an effective presenter and discussant; and 3) to facilitate students' own research. The workshop will cover A&M seminar papers as well as students' research-in-progress.

 
    • HBS 4254

    Empirical Research in Corporate Valuation, Reporting and Governance

    Last Offered: WI 2015
    Last Taught By: George Serafeim

 
 
    • HBS 4351

    Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives on Entrepreneurship: Organizational Economics and Growth

    Last Taught By: Josh Lerner and (HBS\wkerr)

 
 
    • HBS 4425

    Behavioral Insights Group Research Seminar

    Last Offered: FA 2014
    Last Taught By: Francesca Gino and Todd Rogers

    This seminar provides lab experience in behavioral approaches to decision making and negotiation.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Psychology 2553r.

 
    • HBS 4425

    Behavioral Insights Group Research Seminar

    Last Offered: WI 2015
    Last Taught By: Francesca Gino and Todd Rogers

 
 
    • HBS 4427

    Organizational Behavior Lab

    Last Offered: FA 2014
    Last Taught By: Lakshmi Ramarajan and Teresa M. Amabile

    OB lab is a doctoral workshop that meets every other week for 1.5 hours. Students are expected to present their work and attend the other sessions to provide feedback to other members.

 
 
    • HBS 4428

    Organizational Behavior Lab

    Last Offered: WI 2015
    Last Taught By: Lakshmi Ramarajan and Teresa M. Amabile

    OB lab is a doctoral workshop that meets every other week for 1.5 hours. Students are expected to present their work and attend the other sessions to provide feedback to other members.

 
 
    • HBS 4630

    Doctoral Seminar on Consumer Behavior

    Last Taught By: Anat Keinan

 
    • HBS 4720

    The Economics of International Business

    Last Taught By: Juan Alcacer

 
    • HBS 4809

    Applied Econometrics for Research in Management

    Last Taught By: John Beshears

 
    • HBS 4810

    Business History Seminar

    Last Offered: FA 2014
    Last Taught By: Walter A. Friedman

    This course provides a comparative approach to the historical process of industrialization and modernization in the West and Asia, drawing specifically on the examples of China, Japan, the United States and Western Europe. Starting from the mid-19th century to the present, this course will explore the economic, technological, cultural and political dimensions of economic growth and business development. Among the topics covered are the causes of wealth and poverty, the nature and impact of globalization, knowledge creation and transfer, the emergence of modern management, government policies, and the cultural transformation of societies. Each meeting will discuss the key literature by authors in the field, and explore and test the premises on which their works are based. The overall aim of the course is to introduce graduate students to central issues and theoretical discourses in the broad field of business history, and to explore the relevance of this literature to other disciplines. The course provides a unique opportunity to develop research skills through designing, researching and writing a paper using original sources, either quantitative or qualitative. Students will work closely with one of the instructors during the semester on this paper.

 
 
    • HBS 4840

    DBA Seminar for Technology and Operations Management

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Michael W. Toffel

    This seminar provides a forum to provide feedback to TOM DBA students on their emerging and ongoing research projects. The seminar also seeks to bolster research collaboration among TOM DBA students and between them and TOM faculty. The seminar is offered as a Pass/Fail course and has three requirements: 1) Presenters will distribute to the students and faculty their working paper by 9am Wednesday, the day before their presentation; 2) Each student will present his or her work during one of the seminar sessions, leaving ample time for discussion throughout the presentation; and 3) Students will actively engage as audience members to provide constructive feedback to the presenter.

 
    • HBS 4840

    DBA Seminar for Technology and Operations Management

    Last Taught By: Michael W. Toffel

 
    • HBS 4852

    Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Leslie A. Perlow

    This seminar provides a forum to demystify the craft of qualitative inductive research. How do field notes get transformed into published books and articles? How does theory get built and substantiated? What is the behind the scenes process successful scholars are using? Our goal is to look behind the curtain and understand the art and science of writing up this work. It is also to gain an appreciation for the variety of ways in which people work. Towards this end, the seminar will be composed of two parts: 1) learning from others and 2) learning by doing. The first part of each class will involve uncovering the story behind a published piece of work, written by a leading scholar. The second part of each class will involve class participants sharing their own writing based on on-going research projects. This writing can take the form of full paper or much earlier stage memos, outlines or other writing sample. The seminar is offered as a Pass/Fail course and has three requirements: In preparation for each class, participants will read the piece of work by the leading scholar, and possibly some earlier drafts, memos, or reviews. For each class, participants will also be provided a writing sample distributed by one of the class participant, whose week it is to share their work. Participants will be responsible for sharing their work during at least one class session. This course is open to doctoral students who have successfully completed their first-year of graduate work and are engaged in inductive qualitative research projects ideally with data. Permission of the instructors is required for all enrollees.

 
    • HBS 4852

    Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research

    Last Taught By: Leslie A. Perlow

 
    • HBS 4853

    Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research II

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Leslie A. Perlow

    This seminar is a continuation of the Seminar on the Craft of Qualitative Inductive Research. How do field notes get transformed into published books and articles? How does theory get built and substantiated? What is the behind the scenes process successful scholars are using? Our goal is to look behind the curtain and understand the art and science of writing up this work. It is also to gain an appreciation for the variety of ways in which people work.

 
    • HBS 4853

    Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research II

    Last Taught By: Ethan S. Bernstein

 
    • HBS 4880

    Macro Topics in Organizational Behavior: Organization and Management Theory Seminar

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Michael L. TushmanJulie Battilana, and Ryan L. Raffaelli

    Covers classical works in organization theory and surveys the main paradigms that are now active in the field. Also addresses how other disciplines such as economics and business history have shaped sociological thinking about organizations.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Sociology 224: Organizational Analysis - Seminar

 
    • HBS 4880

    Macro Topics in Organizational Behavior

    Last Taught By: Rakesh Khurana

 
    • HBS 4882

    Micro Topics in Organizational Behavior

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Michael I. Norton

    Micro Topics in Organizational Behavior is a survey course covering the study of individual, dyadic, small group and intra-organizational behavior, with special focus on research by Harvard Faculty. At the individual level, examples of possible topics include cognitive psychology, behavioral decision theory, motivation theory, and the study of attitudes and emotions. At the dyadic level, examples include negotiation, social perceptions, relationships and supervisor-subordinate ties. Teams, multiparty decision making and coalitions are possible topics at the group level. Examples of potential topics at the intra-organizational level include conflict, culture, person-organization fit, psychological contracts, justice and power. Most sessions will include a broad discussion of a topic, followed by a more focused discussion with a faculty member about her or his research in the area.