The HBS Doctoral Course Catalog is a list of doctoral courses offered by HBS over the past four years.

    • 4001

    Management and Markets: Administration and Human Behavior

    Last Offered: FA 2011
    Last Taught By: Rakesh Khurana and Amy J.C. Cuddy

    The first part of this course will expose students to the classic works in administrative theory, as well as more recent work on organizational processes, the management of change and the management of technology. In the second part, the course will cover theories of human motivation and human interaction from numerous perspectives. It will include psychological, sociological, and economic theories of motivation, as well as normative and positive theories.

 
    • 4003

    Management and Markets: Organizational Economics and Finance

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: Dennis A. Yao, N/A, and Belen Villalonga

    This course will cover the foundations of corporate strategy and organizational design as informed by industrial and organizational economics. In the second part, the class will look at the functioning of modern capital markets and the interactions of firms within this market.

 
    • 4008

    Perspectives in Management Research

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Kathleen L. McGinn

    Exposes students to cutting edge research across a spectrum of management functions and demonstrates how various types of research contributes to management questions.

 
    • 4150

    Market Design

    Last Offered: FA 2011
    Last Taught By: Peter Coles and Alvin E. Roth

    This course deals with the theory and practice of market design, with prominent examples drawn from auctions and labor markets.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2056.

 
    • 4160

    Experimental Economics

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Amrin Falk

    An introduction to experimental economics, and some of the major subject areas that have been addressed by laboratory experiments. We concentrate on series of experiments, to see how experiments build on one another.

    Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2040.

 
    • 4180

    Organizational Economics

    Last Offered: WI 2009
    Last Taught By: George P. Baker and Oliver Hart

    Theoretical and empirical work on organizations. Topics include agency problems inside organizations, boundaries of the firm, relational contracting, authority, hierarchies, delegation, decentralization, and nonstandard organizational arrangements (including joint ventures, venture capital, and public ownership).

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2670.

 
    • 4209

    Asset Pricing I

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: John Campbell

    First half is an introduction to financial economics emphasizing discrete-time models and empirical applications. Reviews basic asset pricing theory. Second half deals with theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of financial markets using psychological or behavioral ideas.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2723.

 
    • 4250

    Empirical Research in Financial Reporting and Corporate Governance (formerly Empirical Research in Financial Reporting and Analysis)

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Suraj Srinivasan

    This course is a survey of financial accounting research intended for doctoral students. The primary purpose of the course is to introduce fundamental research themes and methodologies used in empirical financial accounting research. Participants will become acquainted with the relevant literature through classroom discussions of assigned readings, paper summaries, problem sets, and individual research proposals.

 
    • 4251

    Accounting and Management Research Workshop

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Charles C.Y. Wang

    The objectives of this course are 1) to stimulate critical evaluation of current research in financial and managerial accounting; 2) to build critical skills to be an effective presenter and discussant; and 3) to facilitate students' own research. The workshop will cover A&M seminar papers as well as students' research-in-progress.

 
    • 4251

    Accounting and Management Research Workshop

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Charles C.Y. Wang

    The objectives of this course are 1) to stimulate critical evaluation of current research in financial and managerial accounting; 2) to build critical skills to be an effective presenter and discussant; and 3) to facilitate students' own research. The workshop will cover A&M seminar papers as well as students' research-in-progress.

 
    • 4340

    The Role of the Corporation in Society

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: Robert G. Eccles and George Serafeim

    Classical financial economic theory defines the role of the corporation to be shareholder value maximization. According to this view, meeting the needs of other stakeholders along social and environmental dimensions should only be done if it contributes to creating shareholder value. Making these decisions assumes that the information is available for doing the necessary analysis and that management and shareholders have the same risk profiles and time frames for value creation. However, this classic view of the corporation is coming under pressure as the government and civil society are increasingly interested in the role companies should play in contributing to environmental and social sustainability. They are essentially arguing for a multi-stakeholder view which does not take the primacy of one particular type of stakeholder, shareholders, as a given. Others argue that, with a sufficiently long-term view, no tradeoffs need to be made since value can only be created for shareholders if the company is not destroying value for other stakeholders. Globalization, recurring crises in the world's capital markets, and the failure of companies to adequately manage risk are also contributing to a growing debate about the role corporations should have in society today. We are at the early stages of even framing the discussion. The purpose of this doctoral seminar is to first put some structure to the debate and second to pose alternative models to the dominant one in place today. The seminar is a broad and interdisciplinary one with readings from a variety of fields and disciplines. Each student will write a paper on a topic of their choice that is intended to help them set a research agenda that will lead to a published article in a refereed journal.

 
    • 4355

    Sociological and Organizational Perspectives in Entrepreneurship Research

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: Mary Tripsas

    The aim of the course is to survey the contemporary organization theory and sociology literature as it relates to phenomena that are of central interest to scholars of entrepreneurship. Broadly, research on entrepreneurship examines factors that affect the identification, evaluation and exploitation of opportunities, especially concerning the creation of new organizations. Insofar as there is a central theme in the readings in the course, it is that an actor's social position is a critical influence on the likelihood that he, she or it (when the actor is an organization) will engage in entrepreneurial activity. This course is offered as a half-course.

 
    • 4420

    Behavioral Approaches to Decision Making and Negotiation

    Last Offered: FA 2013
    Last Taught By: Amy J.C. Cuddy and Francesca Gino

    This course will provide a research overview of the field of behavioral decision making and decision analytic perspectives to negotiation. A core focus of the course will be the individual as a less than perfect decision making in individual and competitive contexts. On the decision making side, we will start with March and Simon's (1958) work on bounded rationality, work through the groundbreaking research of Kahneman and Tversky, and update this line of inquiry through the turn of the millennium. On the negotiation side, we will start with Raiffa's (1982) critical work on the interaction of prescriptive and descriptive research on negotiation, continue through the development of a behavioral decision perspective to negotiation, and examine how the field is currently evolving. We will examine the implications of imperfect behavior for theoretical development, as well as for how to train individuals to make wiser decisions.

    Offered jointly with the the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Psychology 2650.

 
    • 4430

    Field Experiments

    Last Offered: WI 2011
    Last Taught By: Nava Ashraf

    This course is for doctoral students who want to learn how to design and run field experiments as a research methodology. The objective is for students to refine their own experimental designs and be able to run them by the end of the course, leading to an academic paper. The course will be hands-on and oriented towards providing technical skills for the design and implementation of field experiments, including overcoming the many possible associated pitfalls. We will examine in-depth examples of how field experiments are designed, implemented and analyzed, including the "back story" of several published field experiments. We will also discuss at length throughout the course how to use field experiments to test academic theory as opposed to only for policy/impact evaluation. The last third of the course is dedicated to introducing and studying particularly fruitful areas for research using field experiments and to students' presentations of their own research ideas. Advanced MBAs, MPPs, and MPA-IDS, who want to learn the technical skills of running and managing a field experiment, for the purpose of conducting random mized impact evaluations of innovative programs in the companies and NGOs that they will be part of and/or advising, will be allowed to take the course upon permission of the instructor. The course assignment will be a completed proposal (of approximately 15 pages) outlining the theory and design for the field experiment, and a completed IRB application for human subjects approval.

    Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Economics 2041.

 
    • 4561

    Empirical Studies of Innovation and Digitization

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: N/A and Karim R. Lakhani

 
    • 4630

    Doctoral Seminar on Consumer Behavior

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: John T. Gourville and Leslie K. John

    This course will provide a research overview of the field of consumer behavior and consumer decision making. Drawing principally from research papers from the fields of economics, psychology, and sociology, the course will cover topics including preferences, persuasion, learning, and decision making. Students will be expected to prepare the readings, critically critique the research, and actively participate in discussions. An exploratory research paper will be required for completion of the course.

 
    • 4720

    The Economics of International Business

    Last Offered: WI 2014
    Last Taught By: Jordan I. Siegel

    The goal of this seminar is to introduce doctoral students to the field of international business. While economics forms the disciplinary foundation of the course, we will also compare and contrast other approaches from sociology, political science, and social psychology. At the end of this course, students should have developed the ability to evaluate various empirical approaches in the field. Finally, students should also end the course with a well-defined research proposal. This proposal will include a theoretical question, a literature review, an evaluation of the available data sources, and a plan for gathering any additional data necessary to answer the theoretical question.

    We begin the course by reviewing the key theoretical ideas that launched the field of international business. The rest of the course, addressing both theoretical and empirical issues, will examine cross-country issues including the literatures on multinationals, economic geography, and FDI. The course also examines within-country issues including comparative institutional analysis and the origin and persistence of differences in the business environments across countries. The course thus develops a perspective on the extent to which firm choices and managerial behavior are universal as opposed to context-dependent.

    Prerequisite: Economics 2010a or the equivalent.

 
    • 4809

    Seminar in Applied Statistical Methods

    Last Offered: WI 2012
    Last Taught By: N/A

    This course covers statistical methods and models used in management research. The focus will be on hands-on data analysis, including choosing appropriate models, understanding the assumptions and limitations of the models, and interpreting results. The course is designed for students who are already working on their own empirical research projects. Topics will be chosen from methods and models relevant to course participants' own research.

 
    • 4825

    Innovation and Organizations

    Last Offered: FA 2010
    Last Taught By: Michael L. Tushman

    This doctoral seminar will explore the relations between innovation, organization designs, executive leadership, and organization evolution. We will explore the diverse literatures on the nature of innovation patterns as product/service classes evolve. We then explore the relations between organization designs and innovation outcomes. We conclude with an exploration of the role of senior teams in shaping organizational designs and organizational fate as product classes evolve. We will explore when and under what conditions organizational action shapes patterns of innovation.

 
    • 4865

    Management Topics in Sustainability and Design

    Last Offered: WI 2010
    Last Taught By: Robert G. Eccles and Amy C. Edmondson

    This doctoral seminar is focused on identifying ideas on how to transform the U.S. design and construction sector so that that the structures it produces satisfy high standards in economic, design and sustainability outcomes. Buildings account for more than 35% of CO2 emissions and thus affect the sustainability of our society from an environmental perspective. The built environment also has more general sustainability implications for other environmental issues, like water, and social issues, like its affect on the surrounding community and the quality and productivity of the people who work in it. This built environment is the result of a design and construction industry which has seen relatively little change over the past 50 years. It is inefficient, often misses its deadlines, is rife with conflict and produces buildings and other structures that are far from sustainable in many definitions of the term. While most industries have undergone dramatic transformations over the years-variously driven by new technologies, changing customer demands and laws and regulations-this has not occurred here. In order to do this, we will explore a wide range of literature from the fields of organizational behavior, sociology, economics, strategy and design. Readings will include academic articles, HBS and other teaching cases, the occasional article from a business or design professional publication, and books and book chapters. About half of the classes, mostly towards the end, will have industry experts/practitioners as guests who are involved in various initiatives to develop a new and better model for design and construction. Students will be expected to spend some time in the field. The final paper will be on a topic mutually agreed upon between the student and the professor. Broad examples include a general theory of industry transformation, an analysis of a specific industry transformation with lessons to the design and construction sector, an analysis of the transformation of the design and construction sector in another country with lessons to the U.S., and how public policy can lead to industry transformation. Many other topics are possible. Every student will be responsible for co-leading the class discussions with the professor.

 
    • HBS 4006

    Research Development Course

    Last Offered: FA 
    Last Taught By: Michael Luca

 
    • HBS 4006

    Research Development Course

    Last Offered:  
    Last Taught By: Michael Luca

 
    • HBS 4008

    Perspectives in Management Research

    Last Offered:  
    Last Taught By: Daniel Malter

 
    • HBS 4010

    Microeconomic Theory I

    Last Offered: FA 
    Last Taught By: Maciej Kotowski

 
    • HBS 4011

    Microeconomic Theory II

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: Christopher N. Avery and Elon Kohlberg

 
    • HBS 4070

    Design of Field Research Methods

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: Michel Anteby

 
    • HBS 4110

    Foundations of Strategy

    Last Offered: FA 
    Last Taught By: Juan Alcacer

 
    • HBS 4160

    Experimental Economics

    Last Offered: FA 
    Last Taught By: Amrin Falk

 
    • HBS 4209

    Asset Pricing I

    Last Offered: FA 
    Last Taught By: John Y. Campbell

 
 
 
    • HBS 4250

    Empirical Research in Financial Reporting and Corporate Governance

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: Suraj Srinivasan

 
    • HBS 4251

    Accounting & Management Research Workshop

    Last Offered: FA 
    Last Taught By: Charles C.Y. Wang

 
    • HBS 4350

    Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives on Entrepreneurship

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: William R. Kerr and Josh Lerner

 
 
 
 
    • HBS 4561

    Empirical Studies of Innovation and Digitization

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: N/A and Karim R. Lakhani

 
 
    • HBS 4720

    The Economics of International Business

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: Jordan I. Siegel

 
 
    • HBS 4840

    DBA Seminar for Technology and Operations Management

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: Michael W. Toffel

 
    • HBS 4852

    Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research

    Last Offered: FA 
    Last Taught By: Leslie A. Perlow

    (hbs\lperlow)

 
    • HBS 4853

    Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research II

    Last Offered:  
    Last Taught By: Ethan S. Bernstein

 
    • HBS 4880

    Macro Topics in Organizational Behavior

    Last Offered: SP 
    Last Taught By: Rakesh Khurana