Entrepreneurial

Results for Entrepreneurial
  • Media
    Small business owners take next step

    Carla Walker-Miller and Markeith Weldon are both graduates of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program, and they join Morning Joe to discuss.

  • Media
    America's Business Elites Admit They'd Rather Hire Robots Than People

    Corporate boards lavish them with massive pay packages and politicians venerate them as "job creators." But it turns out that America's business chieftains would rather not create full-time jobs to do what needs doing if they can possibly avoid it, according to the latest annual survey from the Harvard Business School (HBS).

  • Media
    US Wealth Gap 'Unsustainable,' Wages Expected To Fall, Says New Harvard Study

    The growing U.S. wealth gap is "unsustainable" and the disparity between the rich, middle, and lower classes is likely only to increase in the near future, a new Harvard Business School study finds. Business leaders also do not expect worker compensation to increase over the next few years, according to the study.

  • Media
    HBS study warns of 'unsustainable' wealth gap, complacency in U.S.

    A Harvard Business School survey of nearly 2,000 alumni has concluded that the divide between America's wealthy and lower-income classes is "unsustainable" and likely to feed into a negative cycle of weaker performance and stagnant wages among U.S. employers.

  • Media
    If government is bad and companies are good, explain San Onofre

    The San Onofre nuclear plant on the California coast is a dark, useless hulk today because Southern California Edison, a private utility, utterly screwed up a $700-million refurbishment project. Home Depot exposed 60 million customer credit and data cards to hackers all by itself, without any government help whatsoever. (In fact, some well-aimed government regulation might have forced Home Depot and other retailers to move to hacker-resistant smart cards long ago.)

  • Media
    Business Leaders Downbeat on Workers' Prospects

    Despite an improving economy and record corporate profits, business leaders are skeptical about their ability to compete abroad and downright pessimistic about the prospect of increasing pay or improving living conditions for American workers, according to a new report from Harvard Business School.

    Co-authored by high-profile Harvard professor Michael Porter, the report also identified a "troubling divergence" in the economy, in which most businesses are thriving, as are highly skilled workers, yet middle-class and working-class employees are struggling.

  • Media
    US Wealth Gap 'Unsustainable', May Worsen: Harvard Study

    The growing income inequality in the United States between the richest Americans and the middle and lower classes is "unsustainable" and may worsen, according to a new study by Harvard University.

  • Media
    The Slow Decay of American Economic Competitiveness

    A new survey from Harvard Business School paints a worrying picture for the health of small business in America.

    While the American economy is adding jobs at a faster pace than at any point since the end of the financial crisis and is growing faster than many of its developed peers, it's still not close to full strength.

  • Media
    Top Business Leaders See Split Economy

    Top business leaders foresee U.S. competitiveness eroding but they're less pessimistic than they were and are far more bullish about the nation's corporations than its workers, according to a Harvard Business School survey.

  • Media
    Harvard Business School Alumni Temper Pessimism About the U.S.

    Harvard Business School alumni have turned less pessimistic about U.S. competitiveness and more confident in the country's ability to keep up with or pull ahead of other advanced and emerging market economies, according to a survey released today.

  • Media
    Average American doing 'very badly': Survey

    Michael Porter, Harvard Business School professor, reveals the results of a recent study on U.S. competitiveness. What's not going well is America as a place to invest and create jobs, says Porter.

  • Media
    Harvard argues America's wealth gap is 'unsustainable' and may worsen as large companies rally while workers lag further behind

    The widening gap between America's wealthiest and its middle and lower classes is 'unsustainable', but is unlikely to improve any time soon, according to a Harvard Business School study released on Monday.

  • Media
    America's Wealth Gap 'Unsustainable,' May Worsen: Harvard Study

    The widening gap between America's wealthiest and its middle and lower classes is "unsustainable", but is unlikely to improve any time soon, according to a Harvard Business School study released on Monday.

    The study, titled "An Economy Doing Half its Job", said American companies - particularly big ones - were showing some signs of recovering their competitive edge on the world stage since the financial crisis, but that workers would likely keep struggling to demand better pay and benefits.

  • Media
    About that Raise ... U.S. Execs Feeling Tight-Fisted

    A survey of Harvard Business School alumni released Monday reveals a series of trends that are widening income disparities and may be weakening the ability of the U.S. economy to grow in the long term.

  • Media
    Study Raises Red Flags for Economy

    Can the U.S. compete internationally? Its companies can. Its workers cannot.

    That is the key finding from a new survey of Harvard Business School alumni that delves into their views of the U.S. business environment to see where the nation thrives and where it falters.

  • Media
    American Public Suffers as Companies Prosper: Reports

    A new survey of Harvard Business School alumni reveals that business executives believe the United States' companies are thriving and will continue to do so while the American public suffers, the Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

  • Media
    Cavuto

    Harvard study: 41% foresee lower wages & benefits for U.S. workers.

  • Media
    Harvard Study Says Economy Is 'Doing Half Its Job.' Guess Which Half.

    Need more evidence that the U.S. economy is moving on two tracks? A new Harvard Business School study, released Monday, may confirm your fears.

    The report, "An Economy Doing Half Its Job," involved a survey of 1,947 alumni. The Harvard-educated business leaders expressed concerns about U.S. competitiveness in the global marketplace. But they were far more optimistic about the future for U.S. corporations than for that of workers, the survey showed.

  • Media
    Assessing U.S. Competitiveness

    On the heels of last week's lackluster jobs report comes a new survey of how Harvard Business School alumni assess the current U.S. business environment.

    "The survey of 1,947 business-school grads found that 31% believe companies will be better able to compete globally in the next three years, compared with 26% seeing a worse environment," reports the Wall Street Journal. But is even that level of optimism warranted?

  • Media
    Income inequality is unsustainable; Just ask Harvard Business School

    In its latest report on U.S. competitiveness, based on an alumni survey, HBS researchers observe: "Labor force participation in America peaked in 1997 and has now fallen to levels not seen in three decades. Real hourly wages have stalled even among college-educated Americans; only those with advanced degrees have seen gains."

  • Media
    Widening income gap in US 'unsustainable' but unlikely to improve

    The widening gap between America's richest and the middle and working classes is unsustainable and is unlikely to improve a survey released on Monday by the Harvard Business School has found.

  • Media
    Tax Harvard, reject the status quo and reform the welfare state

    A survey of Harvard business grads shows that they "see, on one hand, an uncompetitive K-12 education system, a poor tax code and a broken political system. On the other hand, they see high-quality capital markets, sophisticated management systems, pathbreaking universities and a vibrant environment for entrepreneurs."

  • Media
    Why Harvard Business grads think U.S. workers will be worse off

    Large U.S. businesses are posting strong profits and keeping up with the global competition, but American workers might see wages fall and full-time jobs become more scarce.

    Says who? Says a new survey of 2,000 alumni of the Harvard Business School scattered across 73 countries. Title: "An Economy Doing Half its Job."

  • Media
    How U.S. states can get small businesses growing (again)

    Massachusetts has created a model based on public-private partnerships, a promising blueprint other states should follow.

  • Research
    The State of Small Business Lending: Credit Access during the Recovery and How Technology May Change the Game

    This working paper by Karen Mills examines the small business credit environment during the recession and in the recovery-focused years since, as well as the impact persistent lending gaps may be having on job creation as a whole. Last, Mills takes a look at the dynamic and fast growing online lending market that has ignited since the recession and how the technology and innovation those entities are driving may change how small businesses and entrepreneurs finance their growth in the future.

  • Media
    Reframing Infrastructure: It's Really Mobility

    The latest political "cliff" crisis is centered on funding for infrastructure maintenance and upgrades, specifically the Federal Highway Trust Fund. A quarter of American bridges are deemed structurally deficient, rail accidents exacerbate road congestion, mobile networks have variable coverage, and airlines are desperate for next generation air traffic control to reduce delays and fuel burn. America's elected officials must not only put politics aside and work together to invest in infrastructure, they should also modernize their frame of reference for infrastructure, with a focus on mobility.

  • Media
    What Role Does Government Play in Job Creation?

    Karen Mills, senior fellow at Harvard Business School, and Matthew Ferguson, Chief Executive Officer at CareerBuilder, talk with Erik Schatzker about the U.S. job market, the roles played by government and the business community in creating jobs, and the challenges for small business to find skilled labor to fill positions needed to grow their companies. They speak on Bloomberg Television's "Market Makers."

  • Media
    Three ways to reignite U.S. job creation

    Despite the strong monthly U.S. jobs report released last week, it's likely too soon to cheer the positive numbers. In recent years, the number of jobs created has been anything but choppy; for instance, in October 2012 and again in February and November 2013, the U.S. economy generated more than 200,000—enough to keep up with population growth. In December and earlier this year in January, however, that momentum lapsed when job creation dropped to less than 150,000.

    It's no wonder Americans remain anxious. In many parts of the country people don't believe they will be better off in five years than they are today. This anxiety shakes the very foundation of the American Dream.

    Karen Mills, Senior Fellow, Harvard Business School

  • Media
    A Playbook For Small-Business Job Creation

    As Administrator of the Small Business Administration (SBA), Karen Mills spent four years as part of President Barack Obama's senior economic team and a member of his Cabinet, specifically focused on the health and growth of America's small businesses and entrepreneurs. Now Mills has brought her experience as a policy maker—as well as 25 years of experience as an investor and small business owner—to the U.S. Competitiveness Project at Harvard Business School.

  • Media
    U.S. competitiveness hinges on the strength of small business suppliers

    The Obama administration has put in place programs that attract more production, more investment, and more jobs back to our shores, according to Karen Mills, head of the Small Business Administration.

  • Media
    Defining a Microeconomic Strategy for Global Competitiveness

    The United States has been using fiscal and monetary solutions as a base for its economic growth policy. But these macroeconomic strategies by itself are not leading to long-term growth. If we want to create more jobs, increase per capita income and reduce poverty, we need a shift in focus towards regions as the drivers of the national economy.

  • Media
    The America that works

    Regulation, innovation, infrastructure, education: each of these is crucial to competitiveness. Put together the small things happening in the states, and they become something rather big. That is the essence of the America that works.

  • Media
    Continued Weakness in Capital Markets

    US capital market competitiveness remained weak in 2012 with many competitiveness measures suffering declines from the previous year, according to the Committee on Capital Markets.

  • Insight
    HBS U.S. Competitiveness Project View From The Field: Philadelphia Fashion Incubator Supports Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    To boost U.S. competitiveness, one area recommended by The Harvard Business School U.S. Competitiveness Project is for companies to support innovation and entrepreneurship. Macy's is one example, by having an incubator to support startups relevant to its supply chain, writes Chitra Nawbatt.

  • Media
    U.S. Needs a Growth Strategy: Larry Summers

    Former White House economic advisor Larry Summers warned Thursday that a failure to address the fiscal cliff would make things worse as the U.S. economy now is at "critical juncture", but tackling the fiscal challenge needs long-term vision on growth.

  • Media
    IBM, lab join hands to boost US competitiveness

    IBM is joining hands with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to develop technology, products and processes critical to the U.S. infrastructure in an effort to boost the global competitiveness of the country.

  • Insight
    U.S. Competitiveness Project Deems Entrepreneurship Essential; HBS Alumni Angels of NY Responds With Innovative Program

    Where will the next generation of great entrepreneurs come from? David Teten, a Partner with ff Venture Capital, showcases the Venture Capital Access Program, a pilot venture providing women and minority entrepreneurs with access to venture capital.

  • Media
    Harvard Alumni Urged to Help the U.S. Compete

    When a business school solicits alumni, it's usually to ask for donations. Last night, though, the school hit them up for something they may find harder to give: a commitment to use whatever influence they have to get their companies to invest in the local workforce, raise U.S. median wages, and support local suppliers.

  • Media
    Congress can ensure U.S. remains world's most entrepreneurial nation

    Now's the time to push pro-entrepreneurship legislation over the goal line, so we can ensure the United States remains the world's most entrepreneurial nation.

  • Research
    Reviving Entrepreneurship

    Professors Josh Lerner and William A. Sahlman explore the role of entrepreneurial ventures in addressing pressing problems like energy, the environment, healthcare, and education, while also driving productivity and domestic job growth in the U.S..

  • Research
    Enriching the Ecosystem

    Innovation, the classic basis for U.S. success in world markets, rests on foundational institutions, such as research centers, incubators for entrepreneurs, and skills training vehicles, that provide fertile soil in which to seed, grow, and renew enterprises, writes Professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter.